pass


pass
pass
pass1 [pas, päs]
n.
[ME pas: see PACE1]
a narrow passage or opening, esp. between mountains; gap; defile
pass2 [pas, päs]
vi.
[ME passen < OFr passer < VL * passare < L passus, a step: see PACE1]
1. to go or move forward, through, or out
2. to extend; lead [a road passing around the hill]
3. to be handed on or circulated from person to person
4. to go, change, or be conveyed from one place, form, condition, circumstance, possession, etc. to another
5. to be spoken or exchanged between persons, as greetings
6.
a) to cease; come to an end: often with away [the fever passed]
b) to go away; depart
7. to die: now usually with away or on
8. to go by; move by or past
9. to slip by or elapse [an hour passed]
10. to get or make a way: with through or by
11.
a) to go, take place, or be accepted without question, dispute, or challenge
b) to gain acceptance as a member of a group by assuming an identity with it in denial of one's ancestry, background, etc.
12. to be sanctioned, ratified, or approved by some authority, as a legislative body
13.
a) to go through a trial, test, examination, or course of study successfully; satisfy given requirements or standards
b) to be barely acceptable as a substitute
14. to happen; take place; occur
15.
a) to sit in inquest or judgment
b) to give a judgment, opinion, or sentence; decide (on or upon a matter)
16. to be rendered or pronounced [the judgment passed against us]
17. to be expelled, as from the bowels
18. Card Games to decline, when it is one's turn, a chance to bid, play a round, etc.
19. Craps to make a winning throw (of the dice) in craps
20. Sports to attempt or complete a pass of the ball, puck, etc.
vt.
1. to go by, beyond, past, over, or through; specif.,
a) to leave behind [to pass others in a race]
b) to undergo; experience: usually with through
c) to go by without noticing; disregard; ignore [to pass one's bus stop ]
d) to omit the payment of (a regular dividend)
e) to go through (a trial, test, examination, course of study, etc.) successfully; satisfy the requirements or standards of
f) to go beyond or above the powers or limits of; surpass; excel
g) Archaic to cross; traverse
2. to cause or allow to go, move, or proceed; specif.,
a) to send; dispatch
b) to cause to move in a certain way; direct the movement of [to pass a comb through one's hair]
c) to guide into position [to pass a rope around a stake]
d) to cause to go through, or penetrate
e) to cause to move past [to pass troops in review]
f) to cause or allow to get by an obstacle, obstruction, etc.
g) to cause or allow to stand approved; ratify; sanction; enact; approve
h) to cause or allow to go through an examination, test, etc. successfully
i) to allow to go by or elapse; spend: often with away [to pass a pleasant hour]
j) to discharge or expel from the bowels, bladder, etc.; excrete; void
k) Baseball to walk (a batter)
3. to cause to move from place to place or person to person; transport or transmit; specif.,
a) to hand to another [pass the salt]
b) to cause to be in circulation [to pass a bad check]
c) to hand, throw, or hit (a ball, puck, etc.) from one player to another
d) to hit a tennis ball past (an opponent) so as to score a point
4. Rare to pledge
5.
a) to pronounce or give (an opinion or judgment)
b) to utter (a remark)
6. to manipulate (cards, etc.) or trick (a person), as by sleight of hand
n.
[Fr passe < passer (see PASS2 the vi. ); partly < the ModE v.]
1. an act of passing; passage
2.
a) the successful completion of a scholastic course or examination, esp. if without honors
b) a mark, etc. indicating this
3. condition or situation [a strange pass]
4.
a) a ticket, certificate, etc. giving permission or authorization to come or go freely or without charge
b) a ticket at a fixed price that permits unlimited rides, as on a bus or train for a specified period
c) Mil. a written leave of absence for a brief period
5. a motion of the hands that is meant to deceive, as in card tricks or magic; sleight of hand
6. a motion or stroke of the hand, as in mesmerism or hypnotism
7.
a) a motion of the hand as if to strike
b) a tentative attempt
8. Informal a proposal of sexual intimacy, or an attempt to embrace, or kiss, as in seeking sexual intimacy
9. Aeron. a flight over a specified point or at a target
10. Card Games a declining to bid, play a round, etc. when it is one's turn
11. Craps a winning throw (of the dice)
12. Sports
a) an intentional transfer of the ball, puck, etc. to another player during play; also, an attempt to do so, whether or not successful
b) a lunge or thrust made in fencing
c) a walk in baseball
——————
bring to pass
to cause to come about or happen
——————
come to pass
to come about or happen
——————
pass for
to be accepted or looked upon as: usually said of an imitation or counterfeit
——————
pass off
1. to come to an end; cease
2. to take place; go through, as a transaction
3. to be accepted or cause to be accepted as genuine, true, etc., esp. through deceit
——————
pass out
1. to distribute
2. to become unconscious; faint
——————
pass over
1. to disregard; ignore; omit
2. to leave (someone) out of consideration in promotions, appointments, etc.
——————
pass someone's lips
1. to be eaten or drunk by someone
2. to be said by someone
——————
☆ pass up
Informal to reject, refuse, or let go by [to pass up an opportunity]
passer
n.
pass3
abbrev.
1. passage
2. passenger
3. passive

English World dictionary. . 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pass — Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass — Pass, v. t. 1. In simple, transitive senses; as: (a) To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc. (b) Hence: To go from one limit to the other of; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass — Pass, n. [Cf. F. pas (for sense 1), and passe, fr. passer to pass. See {Pass}, v. i.] 1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass — (von französisch passer „überschreiten“) bezeichnet: Reisepass, einen amtlichen Identitätsausweis zur Legitimation bei Auslandsreisen Pass (Sport), das gezielte Übergeben des Sportgerätes im Sport eine Schaltung, um bestimmte Signalanteile… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • pass on — {v.} 1. To give an opinion about; judge; settle. * /The college passed on his application and found him acceptable./ * /The committee recommended three people for the job and the president passed on them./ 2. To give away (something that has been …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pass on — {v.} 1. To give an opinion about; judge; settle. * /The college passed on his application and found him acceptable./ * /The committee recommended three people for the job and the president passed on them./ 2. To give away (something that has been …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Pass'e — Pas s[ e] , masc. Pass ee Pas s[ e] e, fem., a. [F.] Past; gone by; hence, past one s prime; worn; faded; as, a pass[ e]e belle. Ld. Lytton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass'ee — Pass e Pas s[ e] , masc. Pass ee Pas s[ e] e, fem., a. [F.] Past; gone by; hence, past one s prime; worn; faded; as, a pass[ e]e belle. Ld. Lytton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass — Contents 1 Admission and permission 2 Acronyms 3 Transport 4 …   Wikipedia

  • pass — I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French passer, from Vulgar Latin *passare, from Latin passus step more at pace Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. move, proceed, go 2. a. to go away ; …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • PASS — For other uses, see PASS (disambiguation). PASS (the Proof of Age Standards Scheme) is a government backed scheme in the UK that gives young people a valid and accepted form of proof of age identification. The scheme is supported by the Home… …   Wikipedia


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